The Constitutional Convention

Description

In an alternate America, in the 2018 Midterm elections, the American people voted (by a narrow margin) to hold a constitutional convention in January of 2019. Article V of the Constitution holds that ⅔ of state legislatures must vote to hold a constitutional convention, but in response to Barack Obama’s election in 2009, the Senate amended Article V. The amendment enabled a popular referendum, reaching ⅔ of the popular vote, to trigger an convention as well. Such a referendum was held in 2018. The referendum guidelines laid out that an assembly of senators would meet with the broad mandate to “permanently edit, revise, add to, or delete from the United States Constitution.” The delegates in this committee will come from broad and diverse states and constituencies with different needs and wants. While the pretense may seem restrictive, in reality it is anything but. The possibilities are endless (quite literally) and this temporary legislative body has total purview over what goes into and comes out of the new Constitution. They will be tasked with navigating lobbyers, shady dealings, campaigns and elections, constitutional law, and the core principles of American Government in the hopes of emerging with a unique, inventive, and well thought-out Constitution.

Positions

Kirsten Gillibrand

Ted Cruz

Kamala Harris

Bernie Sanders

Mitch McConnell

Kyrsten Sinema

Sherrod Brown

Mitt Romney

Chuck Grassley

Elizabeth Warren

Mark Warner

Lisa Murkowski

Brian Schatz

Marco Rubio

Pat Toomey

Lindsay Graham

Debbie Stabenow

Josh Hawley

Kevin Cramer

Michael Bennet

Tammy Baldwin

Richard Shelby